Arnaldo Pellini: Photos and Words

A diary about my life abroad

Posts tagged ‘my photos’

Winter wonderland series / 8

The barn, 2019

The wind was blowing strong the day we took this walk. The radio and the weather apps where informing about this big snow storm coming which would touch more than half of Finland. People were advised to stay in for the night and the early hours of the following day. We had few hours of light and went for a walk in the countryside. The light was grey. The wind was carrying dry snow which made the air seems a bit foggy. It was not possible to take a tack sharp picture. The road followed the up and downs of the fields and its sides were one with the field nearby. The ditch that usually separates this road from the fields had disappeared under the snow. Then we saw this barn near a farm. People live here. Farmers own this land. I stopped for a second in the middle of the road. Listen to the wind. I thought about the life of those living here. How do these farmers cope with the long winter? How do they manage their farm and income? How far do their kids have to go to get to school? What do they think when they look outside the windows of their homes? I took this photograph as the cold wind from the east was taking my thoughts away with it. I put my hand in the pockets of my jacket to warm them and walked back to the cottage facing the wind.

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Winter wonderland series / 2

Meditating, 2018

A large lake. Frozen landscape. The sky promising more snow. No cars. No roads. Only the sound of the wind

Lahti railway station

An unassuming railway station where the long distance trains which run north-south-north stop to let passengers catch the trains that run to the east. Now that it is winter, passengers seem unsure whether to wait for their next train on the platform or taking refuge, if only for few minutes, in the station building next to the ticket counters and the café.

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Outside on the platform, people are waiting their next train wrapped in their thoughts. Some will soon be home. Others have a long way to go. All in that strange no-man zone which is a transit railway station.

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Halte Senayan, Jakarta

The street photography rules I have

Few days ago I posted this photo on Instagram.

File 9-6-16 16 11 46 2

 

A friend, who is following my account, then sent me a questions in the comments section: how do I deal with ethics in my street photography. Good question.

Over the years, I have been reading a lot about street photography: the beauty of black & white photography, street photography techniques, the best cameras and lenses, and, last but not least, blogs where professional and amateur street photographers wrote about their do and don’t in street photography.

One blog that I remember more vividly is the one by Lilly Schwartz . In one of her blog post she lists the rules she follows when taking photographs of strangers in the street.

During the last few days I have been re-thinking what I consider right or wrong in doing street photography.

While there is a great degree of subjectivity on which rules we apply to ourselves, I think that above those subjective rules there is (at least for me) a more universal rule which is about respect to others and of ‘not doing harm’ when taking photos of people in the streets.

The specific rules that I have for myself and which I try to follow  come under this general principle and are subjective in the sense that they are shaped and defined by the values I have been given through my education and upbringing, my own character and what I feel comfortable to do (and not to do) .

1. I never take a picture of homeless people of any age. Not even by asking them whether I can. I just do not do it. It does not feel right to me. I did it once, about 10 years ago while walking in the street of Old Delhi near the Red Fort. The moment I took the photo, I knew I was doing something wrong. I have not done it ever since.

2. I ask, whenever possible, if I can to take a photo of someone. Here in Jakarta I speak enough Bahasa Indonesia to have a chat and ask if I can take a photo. Most of the times the people I meet are happy for me taking a photo of them and showing them the result on the LCD screen. People often ask me to take their picture particularly when they are in a group. If someone says no; no problem. A smile, an apology, and all is good.

3. There are cases like the photo above where I cannot ask permission to take the photo. The man was on a bus moving quickly along a busy road in Jakarta. However, I do not feel I am stealing something. My aim is document the common everyday life of people living in cities. I am not a professional photographer and do not make money out of the photos I take. I share my photos through my blog and social media as a way to share with a larger community a moment, a split second that for a reason or another I felt was worth capturing to contribute to telling a story that is unfolding every day, every hour, every minute in a city.

4. If a person has second thoughts and ask me to delete the photo I can do it in front of their eyes showing the LCD screen. However, this is not happened to me yet.

5. I tend not to use telephoto lenses for street photography. I usually take photos with a 35mm equivalent or a 50mm equivalent lens. This means that people do notice me and it is easier to ask for permission. I would use a zoom to take a photo of a crowded place from a distant view point.

6. I only take pictures of children when they play happily or together with their parents.

Again, thank you to my friend for asking what rules I follow for my street photography which has made me to write this blog.

Dreaming the future 35/35 -35 days 35 photos 35mm

35 days 35 photos 35mm

Dreaming the future

Dreaming the future and making it happen. Jakarta is building the Mass Transport System. There will be tube stations like this one. Will there be more people and passangers that this photo? I hope so, otherwise the project will go broke pretty soon. Some people say that this massive project is too little too late and that the traffic congestion in Jakarta is so severe that it is beyond rescue. There is one way: how about giving more space to bicycle commuters? Create incentives like tax deductions, or pay back for spare parts or simply showers in office towers.

I set out to take one photo per day for 35 days using my Olympus 17mm f1.8 lens which produces an equivalent field of view of approximately 35mm. It was a project like many others. What I wanted to do was to force myself to see things I see (or better I do not see) on my way to office. I also wanted to walk in the kampung near my home in Jakarta and see what is there and how people live through  the lens of my camera. I wanted to put a target. A project with a beginning and an end. And now it has reached its end. I saw that the streets of this city are chocked by traffic. It cannot go on like this. This is paralisis. This is health hazard. This is pollution. This is not sustainable. I very few cyclists using their bicycle to go to work. Too few of them. I am one of them. There are no bicycle lanes or any other protetcion for cyclists in this crazy traffic. I saw ojek drivers whom I see every days who said: ‘Ok, you can take a photo of me.’

Thsi project forced me to look for something interesting every day for 35 days and not taking for granted the spots and people I was passing by every day. I am happy I did it. Thanks for following me!

 

My ‘car’ 32/35 – 35 days 35 photos 35mm

35 days 35 photos 35mm

My ‘car’

This is the ‘car’ I use to commute to the office in Jakarta. It is called bicycle. There are too few of tehse in the streets of this city. Why?

Suitcase 26/35 – 35 days 35 photos 35mm

35 days 35 photos 35mm

Suitcase

The school year has ended. The summer break has arrived and it is time to prepare to go back to Europe to see family and friends. First things first: prepare the suitcases.

Coffee morning 25/35 – 35 days 35 photos 35mm

35 days 35 photos 35mm

Coffee morning

During the month of Ramadhan it is really different to go to malls on Saturday mornings. There are few people around. The coffee places like this Starbucks are almost empty. It is a different atmosphere, like being in a different city..

Convergence 24/35 – 35 days 35 photos 35mm

35 days 35 photos 35mm

Convergence

The traffic never stops in the morning rush hour. Cars, busses, motorbikes seem all to converge to an invisible destination at the end the roads. They slow down to make space to eachother. Nobody gets angry.

Go-Jek 22/35 – 35 dasy 35 photos 35mm

35 days 35 photos 35mm

Go-Jek

I left the office this afternoon and hit a very busy and traffic-jammed Jl. Sudirman. This bus appeared behind the Go-Jek driver (a smartphone app mototaxi) and I liked the three guys cheering the behind.

Perspective 21/35 – 35 days 35 photos 35mm

35 days 35 photos 35mm

Perspective

I stood under this tall hotel tower in Senayan yesterday. I liked the perspective and geometry.

One against many 20/35 – 35 days 35 photos 35mm

35photos 35 days 35mm

One against many

I cycle to work but do not see many cyclist commuters on my way to and from the office in Jakarta. Look at the photo. That is why: no bicycle lanes, no space to cycle, too many cars and too many motorbikes choking the streets and roads of Jakarta. We need more space for bicycles commuters. That will help to reduce traffic, make the air a bit cleaner, keep people more fit.

 

Preparing for the party 18/35 – 35 days 35 photos 35mm

35photos 35 days 35mm

Preparing for the party

The preparation started at 8:30am and the first guests arrived at around 11am. It was a good time preparing together the decorations, deciding where to put these paper flowers. It was a good birthday party.

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